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Gauging the Resilience of Complex Networks

Carly Russell

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TROY, N.Y. — Whether a transformer catches fire in a power grid, a species disappears from an ecosystem, or water floods a city street, many systems can absorb a certain amount of disruption. But how badly does a single failure weaken the network? And how much damage can it take before it tips into collapse? Network scientist Jianxi Gao is building tools that can answer those questions, regardless of the nature of the system.

TROY, N.Y. — Whether a transformer catches fire in a power grid, a species disappears from an ecosystem, or water floods a city street, many systems can absorb a certain amount of disruption. But how badly does a single failure weaken the network? And how much damage can it take before it tips into collapse? Network scientist Jianxi Gao is building tools that can answer those questions, regardless of the nature of the system.

“After a certain point, damage to a system is so great that it causes catastrophic failure. But the events leading to a loss of resilience in a system are rarely predictable and often irreversible. That makes it hard to prevent a collapse,” said Dr. Gao, an assistant professor of computer science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, who was awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER award to tackle the problem. “The mathematical tools we are building will make it possible to evaluate the resilience of any system. And with that, we can predict and prevent failure.”

Imagine the effects of climate change on an ecosystem, Dr. Gao said. A species that can’t adapt will dwindle to extinction, perhaps driving a cascade of other species, which eat the first, to the brink of extinction also. As the climate changes, and more species are stressed, Dr. Gao wants the ability to predict the impact of those dwindling populations on the rest of the ecosystem. 

Predicting resilience starts by mapping the system as a network, a graph in which the players (an animal, neuron, power station) are connected by the relationships between them, and how that relationship affects each of the players and the network overall. In one visualization of a network, each of the players is a dot, a node, connected to other players by links that represent the relationship between them — think who eats whom in a forest and how that impacts the overall population of each species, or how information moving across a social media site influences opinions. Over time, the system changes, with some nodes appearing or disappearing, links growing stronger or weaker or changing relationship to one another as the system as a whole responds to that change.

Mathematically, a changing network can be described by a series of coupled nonlinear equations. And while equations have been developed to map networks in many fields, predicting the resiliency of complex networks or systems with missing information overwhelms the existing ability of even the most powerful supercomputers.

“We’re very limited in what we can do with the existing methods. Even if the network is not very large, we may be able to use the computer to solve the coupled equations, but we cannot simulate many different failure scenarios,” Dr. Gao said.

Dr. Gao debuted a preliminary solution to the problem in a 2016 paper published in Nature. In that paper, he and his colleagues declared that existing analytical tools are insufficient because they were designed for smaller models with few interacting components, as opposed to the vast networks we want to understand. The authors proposed a new set of tools, designed for complex networks, able to first identify the natural state and control parameters of the network, and then collapse the behavior of different networks into a single, solvable, universal function.

The tools presented in the Nature paper worked with strict assumptions on a network where all information is known — all nodes, all links, and the interactions between those nodes and links. In the new work, Dr. Gao wants to extend the single universal equation to networks where some of the information is missing. The tools he is developing will estimate missing information — missing nodes and links, and the relationships between them — based on what is already known. The approach reduces accuracy somewhat, but enables a far greater reward than what is lost, Dr. Gao said.

“For a network of millions or even billions of nodes, I will be able to use just one equation to estimate the macroscopic behavior of the network. Of course, I will lose some information, some accuracy, but I capture the most important dynamics or properties of the whole system,” Dr. Gao said. “Right now, people cannot do that. They cannot test the system, find where it gives way, and better still, improve it so that it will not fail.”

“The ability to analyze and predict weaknesses across a variety of network types gives us a vast amount of power to safeguard vulnerable networks and ecosystems before they fail,” said Curt Breneman, dean of the Rensselaer School of Science. “This is the kind of work that changes the game, and this CAREER award is a recognition of that potential. We congratulate Jianxi and expect great things from his research.”

CAREER: Network Resilience: Theories, Algorithms, and Applications” is funded with a $576,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

About Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Founded in 1824, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is America’s first technological research university. Rensselaer encompasses five schools, 34 research centers, more than 145 academic programs including 25 new programs, and a dynamic community made up of more than 7,600 students and over 104,000 living alumni. Rensselaer faculty and alumni include more than 145 National Academy members, six members of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, six National Medal of Technology winners, five National Medal of Science winners, and a Nobel Prize winner in Physics. With nearly 200 years of experience advancing scientific and technological knowledge, Rensselaer remains focused on addressing global challenges with a spirit of ingenuity and collaboration. To learn more, please visit www.rpi.edu.

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Source: bioengineer.org

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UNLV Research: No, the Human Brain Did Not Shrink 3,000 Years Ago

Carly Russell

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Did the 12th century B.C.E. — a time when humans were forging great empires and developing new forms of written text — coincide with an evolutionary reduction in brain size? Think again, says a UNLV-led team of researchers who refute a hypothesis that’s growing increasingly popular among the science community.

Did the 12th century B.C.E. — a time when humans were forging great empires and developing new forms of written text — coincide with an evolutionary reduction in brain size? Think again, says a UNLV-led team of researchers who refute a hypothesis that’s growing increasingly popular among the science community.

Last year, a group of scientists made headlines when they concluded that the human brain shrank during the transition to modern urban societies about 3,000 years ago because, they said, our ancestors’ ability to store information externally in social groups decreased our need to maintain large brains. Their hypothesis, which explored decades-old ideas on the evolutionary reduction of modern human brain size, was based on a comparison to evolutionary patterns seen in ant colonies.

Not so fast, said UNLV anthropologist Brian Villmoare and Liverpool John Moores University scientist Mark Grabowski.

In a new paper published last week in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, the UNLV-led team  analyzed the dataset that the research group from last year’s study used and dismissed their findings.

“We were struck by the implications of a substantial reduction in modern human brain size at roughly 3,000 years ago, during an era of many important innovations and historical events — the appearance of Egypt’s New Kingdom, the development of Chinese script, the Trojan War, and the emergence of the Olmec civilization, among many others,” Villmoare said. 

“We re-examined the dataset from DeSilva et al. and found that human brain size has not changed in 30,000 years, and probably not in 300,000 years,” Villmoare said. “In fact, based on this dataset, we can identify no reduction in brain size in modern humans over any time-period since the origins of our species.” 

Key Takeaways

The UNLV research team questioned several of the hypotheses that DeSilva et. al gleaned from a dataset of nearly 1,000 early human fossil and museum specimens, including:

The UNLV team says the rise of agriculture and complex societies occurred at different times around the globe — meaning there should be variation in timing of skull changes seen in different populations. However, DeSilva’s dataset sampled only 23 crania from the timeframe critical to the brain shrinkage hypothesis and lumped together specimens from locations including England, China, Mali, and Algeria. 
The dataset is heavily skewed because more than half of the 987 skulls examined represent only the last 100 years of a 9.8-million-year span of time — and therefore don’t give scientists a good idea of how much cranial size has changed over time. 
Multiple hypotheses on causes of reduction in modern human brain size need to be reassessed if human brains haven’t actually changed in size since the arrival of our species.

Publication Details

“Did the transition to complex societies in the Holocene drive a reduction in brain size? A reassessment of the DeSilva et al. (2021) hypothesis” was published July 29 in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.

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Growing Cereal Crops With Less Fertilizer

Carly Russell

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Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found a way to reduce the amount of nitrogen fertilizers needed to grow cereal crops. The discovery could save farmers in the United States billions of dollars annually in fertilizer costs while also benefiting the environment.

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found a way to reduce the amount of nitrogen fertilizers needed to grow cereal crops. The discovery could save farmers in the United States billions of dollars annually in fertilizer costs while also benefiting the environment.

The research comes out of the lab of Eduardo Blumwald, a distinguished professor of plant sciences, who has found a new pathway for cereals to capture the nitrogen they need to grow.

The discovery could also help the environment by reducing nitrogen pollution, which can lead to contaminated water resources, increased greenhouse gas emissions and human health issues. The study was published in the journal Plant Biotechnology.

Nitrogen is key to plant growth, and agricultural operations depend on chemical fertilizers to increase productivity. But much of what is applied is lost, leaching into soils and groundwater. Blumwald’s research could create a sustainable alternative.

“Nitrogen fertilizers are very, very expensive,” Blumwald said. “Anything you can do to eliminate that cost is important. The problem is money on one side, but there are also the harmful effects of nitrogen on the environment.”

Blumwald’s research centers on increasing the conversion of nitrogen gas in the air into ammonium by soil bacteria — a process known as nitrogen fixation.

Legumes such as peanuts and soybeans have root nodules that can use nitrogen-fixing bacteria to provide ammonium to the plants. Cereal plants like rice and wheat don’t have that capability and must rely on taking in inorganic nitrogen, such as ammonia and nitrate, from fertilizers in the soil.

“If a plant can produce chemicals that make soil bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen gas, we could modify the plants to produce more of these chemicals,” Blumwald said. “These chemicals will induce soil bacterial nitrogen fixation and the plants will use the ammonium formed, reducing the amount of fertilizer used.”

Blumwald’s team used chemical screening and genomics to identify compounds in rice plants that enhanced the nitrogen-fixing activity of the bacteria.

Then they identified the pathways generating the chemicals and used gene editing technology to increase the production of compounds that stimulated the formation of biofilms. Those biofilms contain bacteria that enhanced nitrogen conversion. As a result, nitrogen-fixing activity of the bacteria increased, as did the amount of ammonium in the soil for the plants.

“Plants are incredible chemical factories,” he said. “What this could do is provide a sustainable alternative agricultural practice that reduces the use of excessive nitrogen fertilizers.”

The pathway could also be used by other plants. A patent application on the technique has been filed by the University of California and is pending.  

Dawei Yan, Hiromi Tajima, Howard-Yana Shapiro, Reedmond Fong and Javier Ottaviani from UC Davis contributed to the research paper, as did Lauren Cline from Bayer Crop Science. Ottaviani is also a research associate at Mars Edge.

The research was funded by the Will W. Lester Endowment. Bayer Crop Science is supporting further research on the topic.

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Illinois Tech ‘spinout’ Startup Influit Energy Has Created the World’s First Rechargeable, Safe, Electric Fuel

Carly Russell

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CHICAGO, Aug. 5, 20222—It was only a matter of time—before Influit Energy would need to hire more scientists, before the 2,100-square-foot lab space that the company occupies in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood would grow too small, and before the three co-founders of the startup whose history is inextricably linked to Illinois Institute of Technology would be ready to publicly disclose what they have created: the world’s first rechargeable, safe, electric fuel.

CHICAGO, Aug. 5, 20222—It was only a matter of time—before Influit Energy would need to hire more scientists, before the 2,100-square-foot lab space that the company occupies in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood would grow too small, and before the three co-founders of the startup whose history is inextricably linked to Illinois Institute of Technology would be ready to publicly disclose what they have created: the world’s first rechargeable, safe, electric fuel.

“We have created a new type of flow battery that is predicated upon a composite material that we invented, which is a nanofluid where the nanoparticles are battery-active materials, which we called nanoelectrofuel, or NEF,” says John Katsoudas (M.S. PHYS ’03), co-founder and CEO of Influit Energy. “All of the technology has come together—we have a crystal-clear path before us.”

Katsoudas calls Influit Energy a “spinout” of Illinois Tech. Leading the company alongside him are two co-founders: Elena Timofeeva, chief operating officer, director of research and development, and a research associate professor of chemistry at Illinois Tech, and Carlo Segre, chief technology officer, chief financial officer, and a professor of physics at Illinois Tech. Segre is also director of the Center for Synchrotron Radiation Research and Instrumentation at Illinois Tech, which operates two sectors of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, a resource that Influit Energy occasionally utilizes.

“[Influit Energy’s research] started back in 2009 as a basic science investigation when we were at Illinois Tech and Argonne National Laboratory, and we have taken our technology from basic science development, to applied science, to building prototypes, and now our first product development,” Katsoudas says.

The United States government has also played a critical role in Influit Energy’s growth, awarding the company more than $10 million in contracts to fund the design and fabrication of NEF flow battery prototypes that will allow several agencies to utilize Influit Energy’s batteries in electric vehicles and aircraft.

“The unique high-energy density liquid format of the NEF flow batteries allows use of the same fluids in different devices, meaning fluid, charged at the recharging station from renewable energy sources or a grid, can be used to rapidly refuel vehicles, or for stationary storage and other large portable applications,” Timofeeva says. “Discharged fluid can be returned to a recharge/refuel station for recharging or be charged inside the device by plugging into the power source.”

The company’s current client roster includes NASA, the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), and two grant-awarding programs operated by the U.S. Air Force: AFWERX, a team of innovators fostering collaborations across the military, academia, and industry, and the Small Business Innovation Research program (AFRL SBIR).

“We are using multiple small business innovation grants to demonstrate different elements of this closed loop energy ecosystem,” Segre says. “It takes time when you’re trying to do something transformational and new like this, and you have to not overreach, but ultimately, we’re moving toward the same goal—to actually get technology commercialization.”

Five separate projects funded by the government have been strategically designed by Influit Energy to work together as components of a closed loop energy ecosystem that will one day be able to be commercialized more broadly.

“Everything we’re doing right now is geared toward the specific goal of developing what we call the closed-loop energy cycle, whereby your batteries are not solid materials, they are liquids. You can treat the battery as a fuel that gets pumped in to mobility devices—cars, trucks, airplanes, anything that needs to be electrified,” Katsoudas says. “Every one of our contracts is funding a different aspect of the totality development of that ecosystem.”

The fuel utilized by this new system can be charged using either renewable energy or an electrical grid.

“Components of such ecosystems are batteries for devices like cars and electric utility vehicles funded by DARPA as of now; a refueling nozzle and control system, funded by AFWERX; and a charger for fast charging of the fluids, funded by NASA,” Timofeeva says.

Influit Energy has two separate projects underway with DARPA. One is focused on demonstrating the effectiveness of the batteries in a utility electric vehicle, and the other is a study looking at how to optimize and scale up the manufacturing of the NEF batteries. The goal is to reduce the mass and volume of the batteries.

“The fifth project is related to the development of [second-generation nanoelectrofuel] and funded by AFRL SBIR funding,” Timofeeva says. “This new second generation of NEF chemistry in our unique and proprietary nanofluid format will ultimately provide a four-to-five-times increase in energy density compared to state-of-the art [lithium-ion] batteries and could meet Air Force needs and demand with significantly improved energy density, increased operating temperature range, no fire/explosion hazard, and are made of inexpensive, domestically sourced, Earth-abundant materials.”

Because the fluid in the batteries can be recharged in any location using whatever charging mechanisms are available in that market, Katsoudas envisions tremendous growth and opportunity for the use of Influit Energy’s batteries in the future.

“That in a nutshell is what Influit Energy is going after, and every one of the contracts that we have is geared toward,” he says. “[Each of our sponsors are] funding a different section of the vision. The neat thing is that, from Influit Energy’s perspective, they’re funding this complete vision, pieces of it. For [each of the funding agencies], they’re getting a specific pain point addressed that is specific to each of our sponsors, so it’s sort of a win-win-win. And effectively that’s why we’re going to win this—the complete and total electrification of transportation, the electrification of transportation that doesn’t crash the grid, and the distribution of energy that doesn’t cost us to have to rebuild trillions of dollars of infrastructure.”

In June of 2022, the Influit team successfully completed their first NEF flow battery testing for the electric utility vehicle, which was demonstrated at a commercialization partner site. Katsoudas also spoke at the South by Southwest festival and a few academic conferences earlier this year about Influit Energy’s work, and is now in conversation with venture capitalists regarding the future of Influit Energy. As contracts continue to accumulate, the company is hiring new scientists and is actively seeking to expand its square footage—from 2,100 square feet to 20,000—through the acquisition of a new lab space. Where the lab will be located remains to be seen. The co-founders hope to stay in Chicago, but say they are also considering opportunities in Austin, Texas.

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Illinois Institute of Technology, also known as Illinois Tech, is a private, technology-focused research university. Illinois Tech is the only university of its kind in Chicago, and its Chicago location offers students access to the world-class resources of a great global metropolis. It offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in engineering, science, architecture, business, design, human sciences, applied technology, and law. One of 22 institutions that comprise the Association of Independent Technological Universities, Illinois Tech provides an exceptional education centered on active learning, and its graduates lead the state and much of the nation in economic prosperity. Illinois Tech uniquely prepares students to succeed in professions that require technological sophistication, an innovative mindset, and an entrepreneurial spirit. 

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Original Source: bioengineer.org

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